Ching Shih

Ching Shih

Ching Shih Ruled the South China Sea

Upon the remains of his tattered ship, a young Chinese sailor blinked in disbelief. Once a member of the decorated Chinese Navy, he now remained the defeated sole survivor of a dastardly battle with the Red Flag Fleet. But how could it be? The Red Flag were a group of pirates, led by the female madame Ching Shih!

Little did this young sailor know that Ching was a master of strategy and the art of war. But she wasn’t always an infamous outlaw– as a matter of fact, Ching once worked as a nameless face aboard a floating brothel that serviced other pirates traveling through the South China sea. It was here that Ching Shih learned the art of deception and negotiation, something that aided her later in her pirate career.

Ching was noticed one day by a famed Chinese pirate named Zheng Yi. Ching had garnished a reputation as a shrewd businesswoman, a desirable trait to a wealthy pirate like Zheng Yi. But Zheng found himself falling for more than just her financial savvy, for her charm and silver tongue entranced him into immediately offering her his hand in marriage! Ching gladly accepted, on one condition: that she would be granted co-captain of his massive fleet. Ching explained that due to her trade, she had learned secrets about her most wealthy and politically connected clients, giving Zheng significant leverage. He agreed without question. The two were destined to become pirate legends, ruling over the Red Flag Fleet with power and glory!

Or were they? For only six years into the marriage, Zheng passed under mysterious circumstances. His death was devastating to Ching, who had never dealt with such loss before. But despite her pain, Ching remained strong and stony-faced to the rest of the world. With her husband being gone, it meant that all of his assets were in limbo. But Ching was determined to never again be a nameless girl in a brothel. She gathered up all her might and declared herself the official captain of the Red Flag Fleet, now in control of thousands of vessels and the men that manned them. It was taboo for female pirates to be captains back in Ching’s time, but she was quick to garner the respect she needed — and became one of the most powerful pirate rulers of her time.

Ching demanded all the pirates underneath her command follow a strict code of conduct to keep them in line. Most pirates obeyed without question; the ones who disrespected their superiors ended up brutally beheaded! Ching also stated that taking women captive was strictly forbidden and would be met with death. Although she had a great deal of wealth and power, she could never forget the days working alongside her other girls. Under Ching’s rule, The Red Flag Fleet became undefeated. Not even the Chinese Navy could match her strength, with their own boats ripped to shreds. Her notoriety and capability as a ruler became legendary, even permeating popular culture today.

Logan Thompson

Logan Thompson

Author

Logan Thompson is a writer based in Atlanta, GA. Her credits include numerous films and award-winning games. She loves the excitement of video games and being able to choose your own destiny! When she isn’t writing, you can find her curled up on the couch with her cat (and best friend) Juliet.

Launched on Kickstarter!

box for pirate party women of the high seas card game. 2-4 players ages 10+
Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas

Ching Shih is one of six vibrant, diverse, historic women pirate captains with special powers in this new pirate card game for 2-4 players.

Race to collect sets of cards by suit that include a captain and crew or sets of 3-of-a-kind. Plunder, pillage and raid from other players to take the most pirate booty to win. There’s plenty of adventure, period ships, tresure and mermaid wild cards.  Just beware the Kraken!

 

Did you enjoy this sea story about a legendary women pirate captain? Which pirate captains would you like to hear about?  Let us know.

Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas has launched on Kickstarter!  Get exclusive first access to the game, game news, sea stories and more.  Subscribe today.

 

Grace O’Malley

Grace O’Malley

Grace stood on the deck of her ship, pondering her next move. The English frigate sat in the cove of Clew Bay like a beckoning gift, laden with treasures, just waiting to be unwrapped. It was the moonlight that would betray her. She tapped her bottom lip, thinking. “Mulligan!” She called for her first mate. She still had a few tricks left to her and the fog, beautiful and pearly, floating on the water like a delicate obscuring miasma – the fog would grant her enough cover to get to the much larger, more difficult to maneuver ship and give her and her men enough time to harvest the bounty within its groaning hold.

With any luck, it was one of a group of Barks coming back from the Straits of Magellan, laden with goods stolen from the Spanish Main. She grinned a catlike grin as Mulligan strode up to her, bowlegged and quick.

“How do the winds blow tonight, my lady?”

“They blow fair, my Mulligan. Tonight let’s use the shallow draft pinnace. Take Weasel and Sweaty Sean, the Albatross, La Faye, McKee and the cimarrone Leone. And six more, the stronger ones, good with a harquebus. Make sure Leone has his blowgun, but not too much curare! I want no killing! Just enough to paralyze, do you understand?”

“Aye, my lady. I’ll let him know. You’ll be coming, then?”

“Of course. I’ll leave Ian in charge of the Seahorse.”

Mulligan rolled his eyes.

“I know, I know. And take the signaling lantern. I’ll let Cliff the watch know what the signals are. He’ll make the Seahorse ready in case the English frigate has her dander up and wants to use the brass cannon at night, the moon and all – and wrap the oars in worn cloth – the old stuff cook uses for rags, yes? And wear dark clothing. Tell Weasel to take off all his dainty finery. Those earrings, pretty as they are, they’ll catch in the light.”

“Oh, aye. I’ll get the lads ready.”

“And bring the boarding kit, the ladder, pikes, the lot.”

“Already in the pinnace, my lady.”

Grace smiled, and secured her long red hair into a bun behind her head. “Then let’s go lighten the load of our English friends’ pretty cradle.”

It was very late. They had waited until the moon had sunk almost below the edge of the cove’s wall. Grace smelled low tide, the fishy reek of seaweed, the mineral smell of muck and mud and oysters. The smell of home. She stood hunched at the prow of the pinnace and slowly, slowly and quietly, the men rowed silently around the cove wall and there in front of them, its dark shape outlined against the shore, was the English vessel, running at anchor, still in the night. There was no wind, only the creak of the pinnace and the smooth rippling sound as the low sleek boat cut the water towards their prey.

“Quietly now boys, quietly…” Grace whispered.

“Mulligan, the watch! Do you see the watch?”

Mulligan already had the telescope out and was searching the aft of the English frigate. “No, don’t see him yet…wait…there he is.”

“Leone! Are we close enough?

“My lady, he’s too far away. A little closer.”

“Row boys, row to her starboard side. We’ll use the shadows of the cliff wall to help hide us!” She thanked the gods the moon’s crescent light had sunk below the cliff line.

Grace held her breath. Her skin was flushed, her heart was beating fast and never before had she felt more alive, with the marine air teasing along her bare forearms and the feel of her blood hot in her body, her eyes, the lust for gold singing her name. If they could just stay low and quiet and dark, so that the watch didn’t see them. With any luck the watch would get careless. With any luck, Leone’s dart would strike cleanly and Weasel could scamper up the side first to secure the English decks.

Mulligan hissed for the men to stop rowing. Leone was signaling that he had a clear shot. Grace held her breath, watching the enormous cimarrone stand up and take aim at the small dark shape that was standing, stretching….she heard the intake of breath from Leone, then the forceful explosion of air and the punk! of the dart as it flew its invisible needle-like path towards the watch. For a moment there was no sound but the sea slapping against the sides of the low pinnace. Then they all heard it…the sound of a man crumpling to his knees, then the final thud. Grace turned to her men, smiling a wolfish grin.

“Well done, Leone! Now let’s go get our share, boys!”

They brought the pinnace up alongside the great ship and Weasel and Mulligan took pikes and lifted the rope ladder up and onto the railing of the ship. Weasel went first, small and light, quick as his namesake. Grace went second, then Mulligan with the signal lamp. The rest of the crew followed.

Grace peered through the darkness. There was only one lamp left alight for the watch on the port bow; she walked slowly, a harquebus in one hand, brought up by the crew, and in her other hand, her broadsword.

When all her men were armed and ready, they got in order; Weasel first, the quickest to find the captain’s quarters; then Mulligan to secure below decks, to keep the enlisted men from interfering for as long as possible; the rest of the men to threaten the other officers, and Grace to parlay with the captain to let him know he was being relieved of his burden of goods.

The captain and his officers must have had an officers’ party that night. Hard to wake and dulled by drink, Mulligan, Grace and Weasel locked them in their quarters without much fuss and the rest of her crew detained the enlisted men, who shuffled their feet and looked sullen and angry, but impotent the lot of them without the officers’ direction.

Grace took Mulligan down into the hold to take stock of the goods. In the glow of the lantern’s light, they found small barrels of honey, bundles of sarsaparilla, and bags of dried maize. There was colorful woven cloth, sacks of cocoa, and barrels of Spanish sherry and two of Scottish whiskey,

Mulligan let out a shout. She left off counting the casks of honey and came where he stood. He lifted the edge of a canvas cloth back to reveal the bars of gold and silver beneath. He whistled low and Grace raised her eyebrows. “I’ll drink to this,” she whispered.

There were two crates of cotton in which were hidden two large sacks of rough cut emeralds and diamonds, and several small sacks of raw pearls that caught the lantern light and gleamed with a lustre like moonlight.

There was also ambergris, several gilt scimitars with rubies encrusted in their pommels, salted duck and two barrels of dried tobacco leaves.

“Well, Mulligan. I think we found one of the fattest oysters yet,” she breathed.

“My lady, we have indeed.”

H. M. Sanders

H. M. Sanders

Author

Helen MacKay Sanders is the author of The Widowed Warlock and The Ring Maker series for Laughing Tiger Publishing.  Visit hmsanders.com  to read more stories.  She lives on the San Juan Islands of the Pacific Northwest. When she isn’t writing fantasy novels, she can be heard playing the bagpipes.

box for pirate party women of the high seas card game. 2-4 players ages 10+
Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas

Grace O’Malley is one of six powerful women pirates in the game, inspired by real historical women pirates.

Race to collect sets of cards and score the most pirate booty to win.  There’s plenty of adventure, period ships, treasure, and mermaid wildcards.  Just beware the Kraken!

 

Now on Kickstarter!

Did you enjoy this sea story about a legendary women pirate captains? Which pirate captain would you like to hear about?

Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas has launched on Kickstarter!  Check it out now.

Follow along by subscribing below to get first access to the game, game news and more!

 

Pirate Queen Artemisia

Pirate Queen Artemisia

Raid in the Fog

A thick fog hung over the Persian armada like a bad omen as we sailed after the smaller Greek ships. Even with our vision obscured, we maintained full speed. This was a full-scale assault and we would not let the enemy escape. Little did we know the Greeks were using our aggression to lure us into a trap. Their retreat had funneled us into a small strait where our maneuverability was nearly zero versus theirs until it was too late. We’d gone from menacing wolves to sheep at the slaughterhouse. I knew this raid was a bad idea.

Queen of Halicarnassus

By all rights, I needn’t even be here. I was born in Halicarnassus to a Persian father of the Lygdamid dynasty and a Greek mother from the island of Crete. I lived a fully aristocratic life. After the passing of my ruling husband, I became Queen Regent for my young son, Pisindelis, who was not yet of age to rule. I did not rest on my laurels in this position as many would expect, oh no, that is where my legend was born.

We came to be stuck in this dubious haze thanks to a particularly vengeful chain of events. In retribution for the defeat at Marathon, the great Emperor Xerxes put out a call for as many ships as the Persian satrapies could offer. As acting ruler I send five ships and, though under no obligation, I chose to lead them into battle. This first link in the chain led to my initial reputation as a shrewd schemer and ruthless pirate.Dastardly

Dastardly

With the wind at my back and the salty mist drying to a crust on my skin, winning was everything and I won any way I could. One favorite tactic was to raise the Greek flag whenever foreign ships were first spotted. This way, by the time they realized we were actually Persian vessels, it was too late — they were outflanked and outwitted. I became so infamous for my success against the Greeks that they offered a 10,000 drachmas reward for my capture or confirmed death. That prize remained forever unclaimed.

My notoriety didn’t stop with the enemy, however, as even Xerxes himself sought my council in matters of war. Notably, before the Battle of Salamis – the name given to the foggy predicament we found ourselves in. I was the only commander who advised against engaging the Greek forces at sea. I lacked faith in the other commanders and feared it would lead to a defeat. Though the great Emperor valued my point of view and applauded my bravery in speaking out against the crowd, he decided to side with the majority and carry on with the battle.

It’s a Trap!

The only way out of the trap was to use the fog the Greeks had exploited to my own advantage. I ordered my ships to come about and copy the Greek tactic of ramming our own ships. With orders to hold fast and give no quarter, we plowed through fellow Persian ships. Boards buckled, oars splintered, our allies screamed and many cursed as they jumped overboard rather than be smashed against a mast or riddled with splinters. I directed my crew to push through, let nothing stand between us and our freedom. The ploy was so unexpected, it managed to fool a pursuing Greek ship into turning away and attacking another, more entangled Persian flagship.

I felt no remorse for my actions as I had explicitly stated that this raid was a poor tactical decision. I always looked out for my ships and crew; everything else came second. There was, however, no escaping a confrontation with Xerxes about my treachery when I returned to the Empire.

Facing the Emperor

The emperor perceived my actions as impressive. Not only was I lauded for my quick thinking and determination, but Xerxes granted me the honor of escorting his own children to Ephesus for safety. I was the only one he believed could arrive in Ephesus without incident proving that he held me in the highest esteem.

By the time the children were delivered, my son had taken his rightful place as ruler of Halicarnassus, leaving me free to pursue my own interests. I returned to the sea now untethered to Xerxes and the Persian Empire. In the end, it was a pirate’s life for me!

 

Marge Rosen

Marge Rosen

Game Designer

Marge Rosen is a Game Designer for Seaport Games.  She designed the game Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas.  When she isn’t playing games, she’s playing music.

Coming to Kickstarter!

box for pirate party women of the high seas card game. 2-4 players ages 10+
Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas

Artemisia is one of six vibrant, diverse, historical women pirate captains with special powers in this twist on pirate card games.

Race to collect sets of cards by suit that include a captain and crew or sets of 3-of-a-kind. Plunder, pillage and raid from other players to take the largest pirate booty. If you are lucky, a mermaid may help you. Just beware the Kraken!

 

Did you enjoy this sea story about a legendary women pirate captains? Which pirate captain would you like to hear about?

Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas is coming to Kickstarter soon!  Follow along and get first access to the game and game news.

 

Pirate of the Caribbean

Pirate of the Caribbean

Ann Bonny pirates of the Caribbean pirate party card game women of the high seas famous female pirates

Anne Bonny – Pirate of the Caribbean

Anne Bonny was never “ladylike.” In fact, many fellows at their first glance wouldn’t have thought her to be a lady at all. With a loose tunic and men’s cap perched atop a thicket of fiery red hair, Anne sailed the high seas as one of the most ruthless female pirates in maritime history — all while disguised as a man!

Anne was no stranger to cross-dressing, for even as a child she wore boyish clothing; she had been posed as her father’s nephew to avoid the scandal of being born out of wedlock. But, in spite of these early hardships, Anne grew up to have a fierce and courageous temper. She would often find herself in fights as a teenaged girl, even beating up a suitor of hers! All of this disappointed her father deeply, but she knew that her own freedom and independence as a woman was paramount. She couldn’t be bothered with what others thought of her.

Eventually, Anne was whisked away to the Caribbean by a young sailor named James Bonny. They married without her father’s approval and Anne said her somber goodbyes to her childhood home. But her spirits were soon lifted — James introduced her to the twinkling blue seas and the warm, hearty glow of the pirate bars that dotted the coast. It was in those very bars that Anne found her true calling as a swashbuckling swindler, swapping stories and making merry with the men. But it was on one starry night in the Bahamas that Anne met a man who was different from the rest… that was the night Anne was introduced to a flamboyant pirate captain by the name of John Rackham, aka Calico Jack.

Jack, with his colorful fine fabrics and silver tongue, was unlike any pirate she had ever met before. Anne had never felt love for anyone before — but just looking at Jack’s smile made her heart flutter. The two instantly connected. Jack himself was attracted to Anne’s capability and strength as a woman, and Anne couldn’t help but to fall for his confident charm. It wasn’t long before rumors of their torrid affair spread throughout New Providence, but before poor sailor James could confront his wife about her relations to Jack, the two had set sail. Anne, determined to finally make a life of her own, became a member of Calico Jack’s crew and his right-hand woman!

Within no time, Anne was able to prove herself as a valuable member of the pirate crew. When a puny deckhand on Jack’s ship began to jabber about a female being aboard, Anne silenced him herself: by stabbing him through the heart with her blade. Afterwards, every member aboard The Ranger treated Anne with the utmost respect. It wasn’t long until Anne introduced another female crew member aboard, a young woman named Mary Read whose grit and ability to disguise herself as a man made her the perfect companion to Anne. Together, the two became pirate legends, and their names would go down in history!

Logan Thompson

Logan Thompson

Author

Logan Thompson is a writer based in Atlanta, GA. Her credits include numerous films and award-winning games. She loves the excitement of video games and being able to choose your own destiny! When she isn’t writing, you can find her curled up on the couch with her cat (and best friend) Juliet.

Coming to Kickstarter!

box for pirate party women of the high seas card game. 2-4 players ages 10+
Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas

Anne Bonny is one of six vibrant, diverse, historic women pirate captains with special powers in this twist on pirate card games.

Race to collect sets of cards by suit that include a captain and crew or sets of 3-of-a-kind. Plunder, pillage and raid from other players to take the largest pirate booty. If you are lucky, a mermaid may help you. Just beware the Kraken!

 

Did you enjoy this sea story about a legendary women pirate captains? Which pirate captain would you like to hear about?

Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas is coming to Kickstarter soon!  Follow along and get first access to the game and game news.

 

The Pirate Queen of Morocco

The Pirate Queen of Morocco

Sayyida al Hurra – Child Refugee

I was born to a prominent Muslim family of nobles in Granada, a great city in what is sometimes known as “Moorish Spain,” around 1485. I often wonder how different my path in life might have been had I grown up in Granada instead of being driven away when I was a child. You see, the Christian Reconquista had been slowly conquering Muslim kingdoms in the Iberian Peninsula for centuries, culminating in the fall of Granada, my home, in 1492. To stay meant persecution and forced conversion from Islam, so we fled.

My family, like many refugees, crossed the Alboran Sea to safety and solace in Morocco. For me specifically, that meant the city of Chefchaouen. Perhaps this seafaring voyage helped shape the pirate I would become, but the harrowing escape certainly left its mark. While my childhood was wrought with no other immediate dangers, the ghost of my home across the sea never stopped haunting me.

The one thing that came closest to excising that phantom, though, was education.

Governor

Once safely in Morroco, I continued my education and became fluent in many languages, including Spanish and Portuguese. My gift for languages would be invaluable in my later life as a Governor, diplomat, pirate captain and Queen. My growing intellect and thirst for knowledge would serve me well in my next adventure: marriage.

My first husband was Abu Hassan al-Mandari, a fellow refugee who was governor of the northern port city of Tétouan. This union proved vital in my rise toward becoming a truly powerful woman. With Al-Mandari, I learned the ins and outs of business and governance and was very often left fully in charge of the city when he was away.

The populace so embraced me as their ruler that, after my husband’s death, I became the sole governor and earned the name by which I am most known: Sayyida al Hurra, Hakimat Titwan, the “Sovereign Lady, Governor of Tétouan.” To many, though, Sayyida al Hurra would soon come to mean “Pirate Queen.”

Pirate Captain

Thinking their colossal vessel, laden with valuable commodities for the New World, was impervious to pirates, the multi-decked Spanish sailing ship made for the Strait of Gibraltar. As the galleon neared the narrow birth to the Atlantic, my smaller, faster, and more maneuverable fleet came at them from the southern coast like blades, poised to run them through. The Spanish captain made a desperate attempt to veer north as his gun ports flew open and cannons were readied. The wind that day was mostly due west, though, and while the galleon’s rudder allowed it to turn quickly, the sails couldn’t be adjusted in time, and the large ship slowed. This allowed my nimble galley to streak across their port side before a single ball could be fired, while the rest of my fleet unleash a barrage on the galleon’s unprepared starboard.

Huge splinters littered the sea as cannon fire tore through the galleon’s gun deck, aft mast, and rudder. I ordered my ships around the bow of the thwarted galleon so we could begin climbing the shrouds and ratlines, weapons at the ready should the Spaniards offer any resistance – they did not. While we took stock of our new booty and restrained our captives, my fleet created a perimeter in case Spanish backup or other corsairs should hope to claim our prize.

As it turned out, the day would be ours with no further struggle. It was a decisive victory!

As their leader, I ushered in a time of unprecedented wealth and prosperity for the people of Tétouan, and I did so in large part thanks to the plundered gold, goods, and riches I looted from various Spanish and Portuguese ships.

My vengeance grew slowly from the seed that was planted as a child until it finally bloomed in the form of merciless maritime combat and ruthless ransoms I would personally negotiate thanks to my gift for language.

Strategic Alliance

When I combined my nautical might with notorious Barbary Coast corsair Barbarossa of the Ottoman Empire, true domination of the Mediterranean Sea ensued. With our combined strength, not even a well-armed Spanish galleon was safe.

I first grew interested in Barbarossa when I learned of his efforts to transport Muslim refugees from Spain to North Africa. Together, we patrolled and controlled the frothy blue Mediterranean Sea into the Atlantic Ocean and many of the towns and villages dotting the southern coast of Spain. Additionally, because Morocco had no formal navy, our ships became the de facto force that would protect my adopted home from those who would colonize and enslave my people, much like they had my home in Granada.

Queen of Morocco

My reputation had grown to such proportions that a Sultan of the Moroccan Wattasid dynasty, Ahmed al-Wattasi, wished for my hand in marriage. I agreed, but to show that I would remain the sovereign governor of Tétouan and not merely take my place at the side of my would-be husband, I demanded the Sultan travel from Fez to be married in my city. This was the only time in recorded history that such a wedding would take place anywhere other than the capital. I had become accustomed to getting my way – such is the life of a Pirate Queen!

 

box for pirate party women of the high seas card game. 2-4 players ages 10+
Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas

Sayyida al Hurra is one of six historic women pirate captains in the competitve card game.

Race to collect sets of cards featuring vibrant, diverse, historical women pirate captains with special powers. Period ships are beautifully illustrated. Plunder, pillage and raid from other players to take the largest pirate booty. If you are lucky, a mermaid may help you. Just beware the Kraken!

 

Did you enjoy this sea story about a legendary women pirate captains? Which pirate captain would you like to hear about?

Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas is coming to Kickstarter soon!  Follow along and get first access to the game and game news.

 

Marge Rosen

Marge Rosen

Game Designer

Marge is a game designer and owner of  Seaport Games, an indie tabletop game design studio and publisher.

Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas

Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas

When I first started designing a card game, a pirate theme seemed like so much fun!

Pirate Party card game has been through numerous playtests and revisions but has always featured a historical pirate captain for each suit in the deck. As I started reading up on the history of pirates of the Caribbean and Barbary Coast corsairs, I discovered some of the most powerful and successful real-life pirates were women!

Anne Bonny woman pirate of the caribbean pirate party women of the high seas a card game from Seaport games

Anne Bonny

As I dug a little deeper, I discovered several books, articles and fan fiction about historical women pirates and this really intrigued me. I imagined there were probably a few women pirates, such as Anne Bonny, who dressed and acted like men to sneak by.  Just like there were women soldiers who disguised their gender and fought in wars.

Ching Shih powerful female pirate captain pirate party women of the high seas a card games from Seaport games

Powerful Pirate Captains

There are accounts of very powerful and successful female pirate captains who did not hide their gender throughout history. Famous woman pirate captains, such as Ching Shih, ruled the seas.

Sayyida al Hurra pirate queen of Morocco pirate party women of the high seas a card game by Seaport Games

Diversity

Historical accounts vary and some facts may have inaccuracies, but there were female pirate captains spanning different eras, coming from regions around the world, representing many races, religions, and socio-economic levels.

Sayyida al Hurra was a Queen of Morocco and also a pirate captain. She raided Spanish and Portuguese ships to fight against the colonialism of North Africa and the forced religious conversions of Muslims.

What circumstances would cause a woman to choose the life of a pirate? Considering that many civilizations did not allow women to have any power, independence, or inherit wealth, how did famous female pirates become leaders of fleets of ships and command hundreds and even thousands of men? What were the political or economic motivators?

box for pirate party women of the high seas card game. 2-4 players ages 10+

Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas

I quickly realized these courageous women need to have their stories uncovered and uplifted!

The Pirate Party card game now features six historic women pirate captains – one for each suit.

Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas from Seaport Games is coming soon to Kickstarter.

I’ll be posting sea stories about these these legendary women pirate captains in the future. Which pirate captain would you like to hear about?  

Pirate Party: Women of the High Seas is coming soon!  Follow along and get first access to the game and game news.

 

Marge Rosen

Marge Rosen

Game Designer

Marge is a game designer and owner of  Seaport Games, an indie tabletop game design studio and publisher.